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There are approximately 17,000 new hip fractures in Australia and 4,000 in New Zealand annually.
The cost of the event is enormous, both for the individual and their family as well as the health care
system. We know there is variation in practice models within and between States and Territories
(Aus) and District Health Boards (NZ) and that much of what happens in the acute and rehabilitation
settings impacts directly on the longer term outcomes for the person with the fracture .

The people comprising the ANZHFR are a group of clinicians and experts in the field with
representation from a number of key professional organisations.

The ANZHFR sets out to achieve a number of goals including:

  • The development of ANZ Guidelines for hip fracture care
  • Defining standards of care and measurable quality indicators
  • Ultimately to develop a ANZ registry to allow for timely comparison of meaningful data which should be used to understand practice and trigger the case for change in places where care might possibly be improved.

 

The National Database is coming.. but in the meantime, we are encouraging hospitals to record data using the following forms. 

Australian Patient Level Audit Form
Use this to collect patient level data as per the ANZHFR Minimum Data Set.
New Zealand Patient Level Audit Form  Coming soon
Data Dictionary
 Download for explanations of every field and how they fit together. 

 

Aus map  
More than 17,000 Australians and almost 4,000 New Zealanders break their hip every year, incurring hospital costs of AU$579 Million and NZ$105 Million, respectively.  

The website is designed to serve as a tool to share resources from the latest findings in the international literature, to regular newsletters as well as local protocols and pathways for care. We encourage people to share their resources and also to contribute to the work of this collaboration.

This website is supported by grants from The Bupa Health Foundation (Australia) and Health Quality & Safety Commission New Zealand.

Last Updated on Friday, 21 March 2014 00:00

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